Things You Should Do in Your First Week at Your New Home

Moving to a new home quite literally uproots your entire life. From moving day on, you’ll be learning to navigate your new home and rebuilding your daily routines.

The first week in your new home is both the most excited and the most chaotic. Boxes are likely still scattered around the house, you’re constantly forgetting where the light switches are, and trying to figure out how to arrange your furniture.

With all of these changes going on it can be easy to get overwhelmed in your new home. That’s why we’ve put together this list of things you should do in your first week at your new house to get settled in and prepared for your new life.

On Moving Day

Day one of your move can only run so smoothly. As a result, it’s important to try and relax throughout the day. Remind yourself that you don’t need to unpack and arrange everything today. It’s also a good idea to keep a checklist of everything you need to accomplish on moving day, whether that’s paying movers, handing over keys, or turning on utilities.

Since the majority of your belongings will likely be in disarray for the next few days, you should make sure you have a box of your daily essentials clearly labeled that you can unpack first. We’re talking about toothbrushes, toiletries, and anything else you’ll absolutely need to get your day started.

The First Week in Your New Home

Once you’ve made it past the first day the hardest part is over. It will soon be easier to get a good night’s sleep in your new bedroom, and your morning routine will run more smoothly.

To be best prepared for the first week in your new home, we’ve prepared a checklist of important items to tackle so that you’re fully settled in as soon as possible.

  • Familiarize yourself with the home. Safety should always be your first priority, even at home. Take the time to find out where your circuit breaker is, your water main valve, light switches, fire extinguishers, and so on. Test your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, or just change the batteries so you know the exact date they were changed.
    It’s also a good idea to develop a fire escape route. Since you and your family aren’t as familiar with the layout of your new home as your old one, it’s important to understand where the best exits are in case of an emergency. Pick a landmark outside that you’ll meet at in case of a fire.

  • Change your locks. A top priority for your first week should be changing out your locks. Not everyone is careful with their keys and discriminate in who they give them to. Whether you choose to hire a locksmith or buy and replace the locks yourself, it’s better to get this task accomplished sooner rather than later.

  • Deep clean. You won’t soon have another opportunity to clean a house that isn’t filled with meticulously arranged furniture. The first week in your new home is a good time to clean the carpets, scrub the corners of each room, and do a thorough cleaning of your refrigerator and cabinets. It’s tempting to start putting items where they’ll go as soon as you arrive, but cleaning first will save you time later. The same principle applies for painting your walls.

Natural Landscaping Tips for Your Backyard

If you were to look at a photo of a suburban neighborhood from the 1950s and one from today, you would notice many similarities. The houses have gotten much larger, but they still have perfectly manicured lawns and milky white fences. American culture has come a long way since the days of nuclear families. An emphasis on conservation and environmentalism has added recycling bins to many of our homes. But by and large our backyards remain mostly unchanged.

Some people are electing to deviate from those norms to make their homes and yard more eco-friendly. Part of that change has been to adapt natural landscaping techniques that make your backyard seem less chiseled-out and more a part of its natural environment. With proper planning and care, natural landscaping can give your yard both a modern and natural look, and it won’t look messy or overgrown. Here are some tips to get you started on natural landscaping in your backyard.

Native planting

A big part of natural landscaping is understanding your local plant life. Planting flora that is native to your area is not only helping your yard look more natural but also helping your local plant and wildlife. Often we bring in “exotic” plants and flowers without understanding the ecological issues that can arise from invasive species, both on other plants as well as on the local animals.

So what are some ways you could alter your yard to house more local plant life?

That depends entirely on your taste and on your local flora. If you live in a coastal, warm area, you might choose a sand or shell path in your yard that leads through tall grasses. If you live inland it might make more sense to choose stones or pebbles for your walkway and a variety of shrubs, flowers, and grasses for around the yard.

Lawn dividers

You won’t find any white picket fences naturally occurring in the woods. But nature has its own barriers that can be adapted for use around your property.

Vines, trees, bushes, and even rocks can all be used as natural barriers. People have used rock walls to mark of their property for centuries, and for good reason: they last forever (with some occasional maintenance) and they compliment the natural environment of your yard.

Make your lawn livable

Your lawn should be hospitable for your plants, your local wildlife, and for you. Using natural wooden benches, tree swings, and maintained paths will make your backyard look like the walkthrough gardens that we see in old English manor houses. But you should also keep in mind the birds, bugs, and other animals that will frequent your yard.

By not using chemical insecticides or weed killers you’re already helping your local wildlife thrive. But you can attract even more birds by setting inconspicuous feeders in the trees around your yard.

What’s to gain from natural landscaping?

Aside from looking nice, natural landscaping has countless other benefits. When you’re growing plants native to your area you know the plants are predisposed to grow well in your yard. That means less maintenance, watering, and less money spent buying replacements for dead plants. You’ll be helping the local wildlife fit in, and you’ll be helping yourself by giving your yard a refreshing, natural look.

Video Tour – Single-Family Home – Worcester, MA 01609 Real Estate – For Sale

SALISBURY ST. AREA…BARRY RD…Beautiful 10 year young Colonial on a Dead End St….Open Floor Plan!…9 Ft. Ceilings on the First Floor!….Economical Gas Heat and Central Air-Conditioning!…Large Master Suite has a Tray Ceiling, a Full Bath with a Double Vanity and Granite Counters, and a Walk-In Closet… The Living Room/Family Room has a Fireplace, Hardwood Flooring and is open to the Formal Dining Room…The Formal Dining Room has Crown Molding and Wainscoting….The Designer Kitchen has a Breakfast Bar, Stainless Steel Appliances, Recessed Lighting and Custom Tile Backsplash… It’s wired for Surround Sound and it opens to the Deck overlooking a large Backyard…The Second Level has generous sized Bedrooms, the Laundry, and a Loft/Office, open to the First Level…Underground Sprinklers….Security System….2 Car Attached Garage….2 Minutes to I90 and 290.

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